Tele-Talk来自我们尊敬的行业领袖小组的新鲜视角、深入分析和意见

印度卫星宽带和数字服务完全准备发射

“不可否认,印度卫星通信的未来是光明的。我们的卫星海洋确实有一股强大的潮流,我们需要采取适当的政策来应对这股潮流,以实现或超越移动通信领域的成功,”Ramachandran说。

电视拉马钱德兰
电视拉马钱德兰 印度宽带论坛主席

The Department of Space was quick to kickstart consultations with a draft Spacecom Policy and the Department of Telecommunications announced a significantly liberating amendment to the Commercial VSAT License Agreements. This was followed by the DoT\u2019s Telecom Engineering Centre making a set of brilliant strokes to revamp and modernize the technical rules for Communication & Broadcast Networks for the satellite sector, and more recently, the TRAI brought out epoch-making recommendations on \u201cLicensing Framework for Satellite based connectivity for low bit rate applications\u201d.

In commercial satellite communications and broadcasting, the way ahead for India is only upward and ever-rising since our satcom penetration and usage is far below comparable regimes. It is no surprise therefore that, following the above announcements, almost every day we see reports of activity by one big satellite player or the other, both existing and new. The names of Tata Nelco, Hughes, One Web of Bharti & UK govt., Elon Musk\u2019s Starlink and Kuiper of Amazon are resounding from all sides. At the same time, retrograde steps are rumored as regards satcom spectrum allocation that would be completely out of sync with global practices. This is very disturbing. Big time investors of repute are clearly waiting and watching before jumping in with large outlays.

Notwithstanding the recent progressive moves, it has to be admitted that Indian commercial satellite communications is today only where terrestrial mobile communications were twenty years ago, until the NTP99 Policy unleashed explosive growth in that sector.

Experts opine that similar policy action as taken for terrestrial telecommunications through NTP 1999 is what is the requirement today for satellite communications and broadcasting. While individual steps initiated are encouraging, serious investors and entrepreneurs need the comfort of a clear Satcom Policy that maps the way forward as complementary to, or a component of the forthcoming Spacecom Policy.

Some of the important recommendations for consideration in the new satcom policy are given below:

  • The Satcom Policy should be aligned with the telegraph act, TRAI act and the NDCP 2018 since all these three govern all telecommunications in India. In fact, NDCP 2018 specifically covers satellite communications in three sub sections \u2013 1.3 (a), 1.3 (b) and 1.3 (c).<\/li>
  • Ensure technology neutrality, level playing field and non-discriminatory treatment for all new satellite technologies and all types of satellites.<\/li>
  • Satellite Spectrum:<\/strong> One of the major focus areas for an effective Satcom Policy for India would be to ensure that spectrum for satcom continues to be allocated in line with best global practices and taking into account the vital aspects that, by its very nature, it\u2019s a shared resource between different players. The world over, satcom spectrum is therefore allocated via administrative process for obvious practical and techno-economic reasons. India cannot afford to lag behind others by making exceptions which would potentially hamper the sector\u2019s rising prospects.<\/li>
  • Satellite Broadband:<\/strong> The necessity of providing ubiquitous digital connectivity to the farthest corners of the country demand that all satellite licenses must include the broadband provision, to augment both penetration and proliferation of quality digital services to the masses. In fact, the need of rural citizens is far higher for quality broadband as compared to their urban brethren. It is difficult to meet this requirement through terrestrial media. Hence, in India, satellite services must not be limited to narrow band only and should necessarily cover broadband.<\/li>
  • AGR Issues:<\/strong> The recent clarifications made by Government in the case of mobile telecommunications must be extended to cover satellite communications and broadcasting services also, to ensure reasonable financial conditions. In any case this is required on level playing field considerations also.<\/li>
  • Provision the tenure of License Authorization for at least 20 years for the given orbital resources - both in broadcasting and broadband segments, to ensure Business Continuity.<\/li>
  • Permit direct commercial deals between satellite operators and various licensed satellite service providers.
    <\/li>
  • Stipulate a time-bound single window clearance mechanism for approvals\/authorization processes.
    <\/li>
  • Approve pending applications and new applications for building and launching satellites out of India within a fixed time frame of, say 90 days, as long as they conform to the Indian regulatory requirements.
    <\/li>
  • Rural Connectivity:<\/strong> Reduce levies such as Withholding Taxes, Antrix\/NSIL mark-up, spectrum usage charges, monitoring charges levied by NOCC (an arm of DoT) and GST for rural broadband.<\/li> <\/ul>
    \"\"

    As shown in the table above, in comparison to the USA, Europe and other advanced countries of the world which follow an Open Sky Policy, India has a much Restricted Policy for satellite communications in place. If we are to cater to the huge bandwidth\/capacity requirement to fulfil the rapidly and consistently growing data demand, we need to open the skies for foreign satellite operators to offer their existing capacity over India to complement the indigenous capacity available and for private parties to contribute in this vital field. We should also encourage foreign companies to put up satellites over India, which can then serve as a mid-path between the current regime of leasing capacity from foreign satellites, to that of foreign satellite providers setting shop and launching satellites over India using Indian orbital slots. Concurrently, we need to grow the domestic satcom ecosystem as well.

    So far, satcom in India has been used chiefly for providing connectivity to far reaching areas and narrowband connectivity to ATMs for facilitating financial inclusion. But the advent of the latest technological advancements - both in terms of Next-Gen Satellites (LEOs\/MEOs\/HEOs, etc.), as well as in the ground segment, present tremendous scope for satcom to cater to the latent demand of broadband services, especially for bandwidth guzzling next-gen applications.

    Speaking of next-gen, 5G would also need Satcom to provide ubiquitous satellite-powered services for content delivery networks (CDNs), edge-computing and edge-delivery of video services to end users, while enabling broadband delivery through direct-to-home, enterprises and government customers.

    Moreover, the induction of satcom into the 5G standard in future Release 17 and 18 by 3GPP, forecasts an era of convergence of both terrestrial and satellite technologies, to bring about a homogeneous mapping of coverage and capacity that is likely to cover the entire globe. This would be extremely significant for a country like India which is largely broadband starved in the rural, remote and outlying areas, as essentially, it would be able to provide high speed, high-capacity broadband services to each and every part of the country, thereby enabling and empowering our people.

    The Indian Satcom future is undeniably bright. There is indeed a powerful tide in our satellite seas and we need to take it at the flood with an appropriate Policy to achieve or excel the success achieved in mobile communications.

    ","blog_img":"retail_files\/blog_1634176268_temp.jpg","posted_date":"2021-10-14 07:21:09","modified_date":"2021-10-14 07:21:09","featured":"46","status":"Y","seo_title":"Indian satellite broadband & digital services fully poised for lift-off","seo_url":"indian-satellite-broadband-digital-services-fully-poised-for-lift-off","url":"\/\/www.iser-br.com\/tele-talk\/indian-satellite-broadband-digital-services-fully-poised-for-lift-off\/5123","url_seo":"indian-satellite-broadband-digital-services-fully-poised-for-lift-off"}">
    可以毫不夸张地说,在过去20年里,印度卫星行业从未像过去18个月所见证的那样有如此多的乐观和希望。20年5月,Hon ' ble财政部长历史性地宣布政府决心加强该行业的私有化和自由化,作为经济刺激计划的一部分,从而启动了该行业,此后这一巨大的势头就没有停止过。从那时起,各种政策和监管举措强劲而稳定地流动着,投资者和参与者的兴奋程度显著上升。

    空间部迅速启动了与空间通信政策草案的磋商,电信部宣布了对商业甚小孔径终端许可协议的一项重大的解放性修正案。紧随其后的是电信工程中心在更新和现代化卫星通信和广播网络的技术规则方面做出了一系列杰出的努力,最近,TRAI提出了划时代的建议,即“低比特率应用的基于卫星的连接许可框架”。

    在商业卫星通信和广播方面,印度的道路只会不断上升卫星通信渗透和使用远远低于可比的制度。因此,在上述宣布之后,我们几乎每天都能看到一个或另一个大型卫星公司的活动报告,无论是现有的还是新的。塔塔·内尔科、休斯、Bharti的One Web和英国政府、埃隆·马斯克的Starlink和亚马逊的柯伊珀的名字响当当。与此同时,有传言说,在卫星通信频谱分配方面,将出现倒退,这将与全球实践完全不同步。这非常令人不安。知名的大投资者在投入大笔资金之前,显然在观望。

    尽管最近取得了进步,但必须承认,印度今天的商业卫星通信只是20年前地面移动通信的水平,直到NTP99政策释放了该部门的爆炸性增长。

    专家们认为,通过1999年NTP对地面通信采取的类似政策行动是今天对卫星通信和广播的要求。虽然启动的个别步骤令人鼓舞,但认真的投资者和企业家需要一个明确的安慰卫星通信政策作为即将出台的太空通讯政策的补充或组成部分,它为未来指明了方向。

    以下是新卫星通讯政策应考虑的一些重要建议:

    • 卫星通信政策应该与《电报法》、《印度电信法》和《2018年印度电信法》保持一致,因为这三者管理着印度所有的电信。事实上,NDCP 2018具体涵盖了卫星通信的三个小节——1.3 (a)、1.3 (b)和1.3 (c)。
    • 确保所有新卫星技术和各类卫星的技术中立、公平竞争和非歧视待遇。
    • 卫星光谱:对印度来说,有效的卫星通信政策的重点领域之一将是确保卫星通信频谱继续按照全球最佳实践进行分配,并考虑到其本质上是不同参与者共享资源的重要方面。因此,在世界范围内,出于明显的实际和技术经济原因,卫星通信频谱是通过行政程序分配的。印度不能因为例外而落后于其他国家,否则可能会阻碍该行业不断增长的前景。
    • 卫星宽带:为美国最偏远的角落提供无处不在的数字连接的必要性要求所有卫星许可证必须包括宽带供应,以扩大高质量数字服务对大众的渗透和扩散。事实上,与城市居民相比,农村居民对优质宽带的需求要高得多。通过地面媒体很难满足这一要求。因此,在印度,卫星服务不能仅限于窄带,而必须覆盖宽带。
    • AGR的问题:政府最近在移动电信方面所作的澄清必须扩大到包括卫星通信和广播服务,以确保合理的财政条件。无论如何,这也是公平竞争的需要。
    • 为给定的轨道资源提供至少20年的许可证授权,包括广播和宽带段,以确保业务连续性。
    • 允许卫星营办商与各持牌卫星服务提供商之间进行直接商业交易。
    • 规定有时限的单一窗口审批/授权程序。
    • 在一个固定的时间框架内,只要符合印度的监管要求,比如90天内,批准在印度建造和发射卫星的未决申请和新申请。
    • 农村连接:减少诸如预提税、Antrix/NSIL加价、频谱使用费、NOCC (DoT的一个分支)和GST对农村宽带征收的监控费用。



    如上表所示,与遵循开放天空政策的美国、欧洲和其他发达国家相比,印度的卫星通信政策受到了很大的限制。如果我们要迎合的巨大带宽/能力要求实现快速和持续增长的数据需求,我们需要打开天空为外国卫星运营商提供他们现有的能力在印度补充可用的自主能力和私人聚会在这个至关重要的领域做出贡献的人们。我们还应该鼓励外国公司在印度上空发射卫星,这样就可以在目前从外国卫星租赁能力的制度和外国卫星供应商利用印度轨道槽在印度上空部署和发射卫星的制度之间起到中间作用。同时,我们也需要发展国内的卫星通信生态系统。

    到目前为止,卫星通信在印度主要用于实现偏远地区互联互通和atm窄带互联互通,促进普惠金融。但是,最新技术进步的出现——无论是在下一代卫星(LEOs/MEOs/HEOs等)方面,还是在地面部分,都为卫星通信提供了巨大的空间,以满足宽带服务的潜在需求,特别是带宽消耗巨大的下一代应用。

    说到下一代,5G还需要卫星通信为内容交付网络(cdn)提供无处不在的卫星供电服务,为终端用户提供边缘计算和边缘视频服务,同时实现通过直接到家庭、企业和政府客户的宽带交付。

    此外,在未来的第17版和第18版中,3GPP将卫星通信纳入5G标准,这预示着一个地面和卫星技术融合的时代,将带来覆盖范围和容量的同质映射,可能覆盖整个全球。对于印度这样在农村、偏远和边远地区宽带严重匮乏的国家来说,这将是非常重要的,因为基本上,它将能够为全国各地提供高速、高容量的宽带服务,从而使我们的人民获得能力。

    不可否认,印度卫星通信的未来是光明的。在我们的卫星海洋中确实有一个强大的潮流,我们需要用一个适当的政策来应对它的洪水,以实现或超越移动通信所取得的成功。

    免责声明:所表达的观点仅属于作者本人,ETTelecom.com并不一定订阅。乐动体育1002乐动体育乐动娱乐招聘乐动娱乐招聘乐动体育1002乐动体育对于直接或间接给任何个人/组织造成的任何损害,网讯概不负责。


The Department of Space was quick to kickstart consultations with a draft Spacecom Policy and the Department of Telecommunications announced a significantly liberating amendment to the Commercial VSAT License Agreements. This was followed by the DoT\u2019s Telecom Engineering Centre making a set of brilliant strokes to revamp and modernize the technical rules for Communication & Broadcast Networks for the satellite sector, and more recently, the TRAI brought out epoch-making recommendations on \u201cLicensing Framework for Satellite based connectivity for low bit rate applications\u201d.

In commercial satellite communications and broadcasting, the way ahead for India is only upward and ever-rising since our satcom penetration and usage is far below comparable regimes. It is no surprise therefore that, following the above announcements, almost every day we see reports of activity by one big satellite player or the other, both existing and new. The names of Tata Nelco, Hughes, One Web of Bharti & UK govt., Elon Musk\u2019s Starlink and Kuiper of Amazon are resounding from all sides. At the same time, retrograde steps are rumored as regards satcom spectrum allocation that would be completely out of sync with global practices. This is very disturbing. Big time investors of repute are clearly waiting and watching before jumping in with large outlays.

Notwithstanding the recent progressive moves, it has to be admitted that Indian commercial satellite communications is today only where terrestrial mobile communications were twenty years ago, until the NTP99 Policy unleashed explosive growth in that sector.

Experts opine that similar policy action as taken for terrestrial telecommunications through NTP 1999 is what is the requirement today for satellite communications and broadcasting. While individual steps initiated are encouraging, serious investors and entrepreneurs need the comfort of a clear Satcom Policy that maps the way forward as complementary to, or a component of the forthcoming Spacecom Policy.

Some of the important recommendations for consideration in the new satcom policy are given below:

  • The Satcom Policy should be aligned with the telegraph act, TRAI act and the NDCP 2018 since all these three govern all telecommunications in India. In fact, NDCP 2018 specifically covers satellite communications in three sub sections \u2013 1.3 (a), 1.3 (b) and 1.3 (c).<\/li>
  • Ensure technology neutrality, level playing field and non-discriminatory treatment for all new satellite technologies and all types of satellites.<\/li>
  • Satellite Spectrum:<\/strong> One of the major focus areas for an effective Satcom Policy for India would be to ensure that spectrum for satcom continues to be allocated in line with best global practices and taking into account the vital aspects that, by its very nature, it\u2019s a shared resource between different players. The world over, satcom spectrum is therefore allocated via administrative process for obvious practical and techno-economic reasons. India cannot afford to lag behind others by making exceptions which would potentially hamper the sector\u2019s rising prospects.<\/li>
  • Satellite Broadband:<\/strong> The necessity of providing ubiquitous digital connectivity to the farthest corners of the country demand that all satellite licenses must include the broadband provision, to augment both penetration and proliferation of quality digital services to the masses. In fact, the need of rural citizens is far higher for quality broadband as compared to their urban brethren. It is difficult to meet this requirement through terrestrial media. Hence, in India, satellite services must not be limited to narrow band only and should necessarily cover broadband.<\/li>
  • AGR Issues:<\/strong> The recent clarifications made by Government in the case of mobile telecommunications must be extended to cover satellite communications and broadcasting services also, to ensure reasonable financial conditions. In any case this is required on level playing field considerations also.<\/li>
  • Provision the tenure of License Authorization for at least 20 years for the given orbital resources - both in broadcasting and broadband segments, to ensure Business Continuity.<\/li>
  • Permit direct commercial deals between satellite operators and various licensed satellite service providers.
    <\/li>
  • Stipulate a time-bound single window clearance mechanism for approvals\/authorization processes.
    <\/li>
  • Approve pending applications and new applications for building and launching satellites out of India within a fixed time frame of, say 90 days, as long as they conform to the Indian regulatory requirements.
    <\/li>
  • Rural Connectivity:<\/strong> Reduce levies such as Withholding Taxes, Antrix\/NSIL mark-up, spectrum usage charges, monitoring charges levied by NOCC (an arm of DoT) and GST for rural broadband.<\/li> <\/ul>
    \"\"

    As shown in the table above, in comparison to the USA, Europe and other advanced countries of the world which follow an Open Sky Policy, India has a much Restricted Policy for satellite communications in place. If we are to cater to the huge bandwidth\/capacity requirement to fulfil the rapidly and consistently growing data demand, we need to open the skies for foreign satellite operators to offer their existing capacity over India to complement the indigenous capacity available and for private parties to contribute in this vital field. We should also encourage foreign companies to put up satellites over India, which can then serve as a mid-path between the current regime of leasing capacity from foreign satellites, to that of foreign satellite providers setting shop and launching satellites over India using Indian orbital slots. Concurrently, we need to grow the domestic satcom ecosystem as well.

    So far, satcom in India has been used chiefly for providing connectivity to far reaching areas and narrowband connectivity to ATMs for facilitating financial inclusion. But the advent of the latest technological advancements - both in terms of Next-Gen Satellites (LEOs\/MEOs\/HEOs, etc.), as well as in the ground segment, present tremendous scope for satcom to cater to the latent demand of broadband services, especially for bandwidth guzzling next-gen applications.

    Speaking of next-gen, 5G would also need Satcom to provide ubiquitous satellite-powered services for content delivery networks (CDNs), edge-computing and edge-delivery of video services to end users, while enabling broadband delivery through direct-to-home, enterprises and government customers.

    Moreover, the induction of satcom into the 5G standard in future Release 17 and 18 by 3GPP, forecasts an era of convergence of both terrestrial and satellite technologies, to bring about a homogeneous mapping of coverage and capacity that is likely to cover the entire globe. This would be extremely significant for a country like India which is largely broadband starved in the rural, remote and outlying areas, as essentially, it would be able to provide high speed, high-capacity broadband services to each and every part of the country, thereby enabling and empowering our people.

    The Indian Satcom future is undeniably bright. There is indeed a powerful tide in our satellite seas and we need to take it at the flood with an appropriate Policy to achieve or excel the success achieved in mobile communications.

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